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Being Aware of Your Anger

Much of the work done in psychotherapy involves increasing awareness of emotions, such as anger, and finding ways to use them constructively. 

Anger can be informative and motivating. For someone who usually feels content, a feeling of anger can inform her that something is not right.  The anger can act as a separating energy, motivating her to separate from what is harmful.

If we ignore our anger, it may become manifested in less conscious ways.  Suppressed anger can become experienced as physical symptoms and/or illness.   The anger may “build up” and become expressed at later times, sometimes explosively or of proportion to the situation at hand.  Without acknowledging our natural emotions as they arise, we may convince ourselves that everything is okay even when it isn’t, and thus be less motivated to make the changes that could actually improve the situation.

If you are chronically angry, have difficulty controlling it, or are otherwise finding it interfering with your overall wellbeing, it would be a good idea to get help.  Exploring how your anger is connected to current and/or past experiences, working to understand and resolve any related underlying tension, and developing skills for coping with the anger when it arises can be extremely beneficial. 

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Exercise For Mental Health

It’s no secret that exercise is good for your mental health. Researchers are finding that it is an effective complement to the treatment of depression.  It is also, of course, great for the mood even if you don’t have depression.  This spring and summer, try incorporating a brisk walk outside (or other preferred exercise) into your routine and see whether it makes a difference in your mood.

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Got the Blues? It Could be Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Year after year, when winter rolls around, some people may repeatedly experience a significant change in the way they feel and behave. Starting in late fall and subsiding in early spring, they may feel especially sad, irritable, or sluggish, want to sleep more, and crave sweets and starchy foods. They might notice a lack of interest or pleasure in usual hobbies or friends, or a decreased interest in sex. These are all possible signs of Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD), a type of depression experienced by an estimated 10% of people living in northern countries.

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Holiday Stress, Recognize Your Risk For Holiday Depression

The holiday season is supposed to be joyful and care-free…right? Well, this is certainly a hope. However, for many, this time of year can be stressful and even depressing. Here are a few common sources of stress and depression this time of year.

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Back to School Stress, Coping with Transition

As August winds down, parents, children, and teens are beginning to turn their attention toward the start of the school year.  Getting back into a routine has its benefits, but for many, this time of transition feels overwhelming.  Here are some tips to help you keep your mind and body healthy as the school year approaches.    

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